Welocalize Sponsors Charity Gala Event for The Aslan Project

Frederick, Maryland – October 11 – Welocalize, global leader in innovative translation and localization solutions, is a sponsor at the upcoming charity event to raise awareness about the transformative work carried out by The Aslan Project, a non-profit organization working to improve access to pediatric cancer care in low-income countries. This special evening gala event is taking place on Saturday, October 14, 2017, from 6PM onwards at the law offices of Jones Day in NW Washington, DC 20001.

Founded in 2012, The Aslan Project brings together a diverse group of volunteer medical experts, parents and advocates to champion the cause of pediatric and adolescent cancer care in low-income countries. Welocalize CEO Smith Yewell is Chairman of The Aslan Project.

“In the United States, more than 80 percent of children with cancer survive. In developing countries, the reverse is true. The Aslan Project’s mission is to redress the inequality by providing sustainable pediatric and adolescent cancer health care systems in developing countries,” said Smith Yewell, Chairman of The Aslan Project. “The charity needs the continuous support of sponsors to ensure children and their families receive the right cancer treatment and care. Welocalize is proud to support this special evening to help generate awareness and raise funds to enable the team to continue its fantastic work.”

The evening event starts at 6PM with cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and a silent auction. There will be a short program presentation detailing the latest work of The Aslan Project followed by fund raising activities. To find out more information about The Aslan Project, visit www.aslanproject.org

Welocalize, Inc., founded in 1997, offers innovative language services to help global brands reach audiences around the world in more than 175 languages. We provide translation and localization services, talent management, language tools, automation and technology, quality and program management. Our range of managed language services include machine translation, digital marketing, validation and testing, interpretation, staffing and enterprise translation management technologies. We specialize in consumer, technology, manufacturing, learning, oil and gas, travel and hospitality, marketing and advertising, finance, legal and life sciences industry language solutions. With more than 1,500 full-time employees worldwide, Welocalize maintains offices in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Ireland, Spain, Italy, Romania, Poland, Hungary, Japan and China. www.welocalize.com

2017 Partnerships in Clinical Trials Europe

The 2017 Partnerships in Clinical Trials Europe is the most anticipated event for 1,000+ clinical trial professionals working in the medical device, pharmaceutical and biotech industries.
Join us in the Exhibit Hall to meet our team. Welocalize Life Sciences has extensive experience working with clinical trials, and regulatory agencies around the globe. We fully understand the critical nature of clinical research and trials and the extensive regulatory reviews they undergo. Our team of highly-qualified, experienced language professionals work within a framework of regulated processes and robust quality-control systems to provide translations that get your products on the market faster while mitigating risks. Find out more about our clinical research & trial experience here.

Five Tips for Global Content Marketers in the Life Sciences Industry

Aging populations worldwide, coupled with extended life expectancy, create a sustainable demand for healthcare, medical devices and pharmaceuticals. To reach patients in new and emerging markets, Welocalize Life Sciences shares five ways content marketers can achieve greater success in the localization of branded and digital content.

    1. Create usercentric websites. Incorporating auto-navigational functions on a website will automatically ensure a site’s content is localized for the correct country without a user having to select a language. This contributes to the visitor’s ease of use and seamless access to information available on the website in their language.
    2. Adapt and transcreate. Global, multilingual marketing campaigns are complex. There are many reasons why the process can be challenging. For example, languages vary widely in text length when translated making adaptation of the layout to suit different devices an additional consideration. In addition, translation alone is not always enough to convey the same meaning in another language. Instead, transcreation is involved to adapt the content, images and product to the local market.
    3. Localize logos and symbols. The average consumer is exposed to thousands of forms of brand impressions per day—from billboards to pop-up ads. This highlights the importance of having a logo that stands out from the crowd. If a company name is part of the logo, make sure it will be successful in other markets. A name may need to be altered or translated to resonate and not offend. Here are some examples of global branding blunders committed by some very well-known global companies. According to Doctor Multimedia, medical logos tend to be represented through the colors blue, green, black, grey and white to communicate formality, trust, professionalism and cleanliness. Colors and symbols can have different meanings from region to region. Find out what colors mean across cultures.
    4. Collect data, carefully. Data can be collected for numerous reasons such as helping to place patients in the correct clinical trials. Although successful data collection can prove successful for future marketing needs globally, rules and regulations must be adhered to for the sake of the consumer and business. Research is vital, but so is patient confidentiality, so the collection and storage of data must be secure and follow regulations of the given country. Important: Within the European Union, Directive 95/ 46/ EC states collecting and processing personal data of individuals can only be allowed under certain circumstances. Know each country’s data collection and privacy laws.
    5. Get social. Thanks to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other social and rich media outlets, customers and patients have a multitude of forums to find out about products and services. The rapidly evolving social networking landscape provides an open playing field for consumers to access your materials across global, cultural and linguistic lines. Social media is also increasingly becoming a useful and valuable tool for clinical trial recruitment through engaging with online patient populations. The reality for global marketers is that much of the world is engaged in social media channels. According to a study conducted by The Nielsen Company, the reach and usage of social networking and blog sites in Brazil, Italy, Spain and Japan has surpassed the United States and United Kingdom. However, Countries such as Turkey, Iran, Pakistan and China may be more difficult to reach as many social sharing sites are blocked or restricted. Tip: The Welocalize Global Guide for Content Marketers offers some quick references, fun facts and easy tips to help global marketers begin the journey into driving awareness, expanding reach, and effectively engaging a “local” audience around the world.

For any successful marketing initiative, content must be available in the languages expected by the target audience and should be localized.  The patient or consumer must be able to easily find the information in which they require, in the language in which is needed, and then be able to purchase products or services successfully via a working payment service.

With some careful forethought, active listening and experienced partners to assist you, capturing a global—and local—voice through content marketing is doable, if not a must, to remain competitive.

Contact us for a free, no obligation quote of your advertising, marketing and website translation projects.

Welocalize Thanks Global Translators All Over the World

Happy International Translation Day!

September 30 is officially International Translation Day and a day that Welocalize celebrates, sending good wishes to all translators around the world. In 2016, Welocalize translators and linguists processed over 1.16 billion words into 175 languages and 400+ language pairs for global organizations all over the world.

International Translation Day is a day which has been celebrated since 1991, in honor of Jerome of Stridon, translator of the Bible from Greek and Hebrew into Latin and patron saint of translators. This celebration has been promoted by the International Federation of Translators (FIT) to show the solidarity of the translator community across the world, and to promote this profession which is crucial for globalization and communication between different cultures.

The idea was conceived in 1953 by FIT and in 1991, FIT launched a plan for the day to be officially recognized. On May 24, 2017, the United Nations General Assembly declared September 30 as International Translation Day. It recognized that the role of professional translation is fundamental in defending the purposes and principles of the United Nations Charter, connecting and bringing together nations, facilitating dialogue, understanding and cooperation and promoting peace and safety among all peoples of the world.

As the seventh largest language service provider in the world*, Welocalize is proud to honor and celebrate this day with the brilliant translators and linguists all over the world that we have the pleasure of working with. Welocalize was founded in 1997 and started with the translation of a single word, “Pathfinder”. Twenty years have passed since then, and this year, Welocalize is celebrating its 20th Anniversary. Welocalize would like to wish all translators a happy International Translation Day 2017!

We want to thank you for your great work and for supporting brands on their global journey, connecting people in all corners of the world.

*Welocalize is ranked 7th largest language service provider in the world and 4th largest in North America, Common Sense Advisory Research, “Who’s Who in Language Services and Technology: 2017 Rankings”

Written by Adriana Martín, Welocalize Global Marketing Team

2017 RAPS Regulatory Convergence

The 2017 RAPS Regulatory Convergence is the premier event for 1,800+ regulatory professionals working in the medical device, pharmaceutical and biotech industries. Join us in the Exhibit Hall at booth #733 to meet our team. Welocalize Life Sciences has extensive experience working with regulatory agencies around the globe. We fully understand the critical nature of texts that undergo regulatory reviews, and our team of highly-qualified, experienced language professionals work within a framework of regulated processes and robust quality-control systems to provide translations that get your products on the market faster while mitigating risks. Find out more about our regulatory experience here.

Meet us at booth 733.

Visit Event Website

Localization Facilitates Global Business

Global, multilingual marketing campaigns are complex. There are many reasons why the process can be challenging. For example, languages vary widely in text length when translated making adaptation of the layout to suit different devices an additional consideration. In addition, translation alone is not always enough to convey the same meaning in another language. Instead, transcreation is involved to adapt the content, images and product to the local market.

Several technology solutions are available to help navigate the process of global content creation and translation, including content management systems (CMS), digital asset management systems (DAMS) and translation management systems (TMS). These systems are the bedrock of multilingual marketing programs.  They help optimize efficiency and streamline the workflow and are also increasingly being integrated and packaged together by language services providers (LSPs).

This post takes a closer look at the tools and techniques available to global biotechnology, pharmaceutical, medical device and healthcare organizations for managing multilingual marketing programs at this level of complexity and scale.

Choose an appropriate CMS. A good CMS is the starting point for any global digital marketer. There are many choices out there today, all with very attractive pitches. Discussing the features of a good CMS and how to choose one will go beyond this article’s scope and length. Building a secure and professional looking website that can display effectively on desktop, tablet and mobile requires a certain amount of knowledge and experience. Apply that to a global life sciences organization that requires multilingual and multi-user support and the complexity and expertise needed increases exponentially. Marketing managers should make the decision based on the advice of an experienced and unbiased digital marketer who can choose the best CMS based on the needs and budget of the organization.

Involve local stakeholders from the start. With the right tool in place, the right team comes next. While brand and message strategy should come from the top via a global team to ensure consistency, localization input and execution should involve local stakeholders from the start to avoid costly errors. This is especially important in the life sciences industry where the marketing of drugs and devices is regulated differently depending on the region or country. Your LSP should also have experience in the industry and the region where the product or drugs are being marketed.

Centralize the translation process. Even the biggest pharmaceutical company with in-house localization teams will require outsourcing to stay nimble and flexible in production capacity and costs. The best strategy is to work with an LSP on a long-term basis and centralize the translation process. By maintaining a centralized translation memory and terminology database, organizations save time and money and realize greater translation consistency. The LSP should also have life sciences industry experience and the ability to ramp-up to meet large projects or tight turnaround times. For more information on how to select an LSP, click here.

Contact us if you’re in need of translation services, including transcreation and localization of your global marketing messages. Read the Welocalize Global Guide for Content Marketers for quick references and easy tips to help begin the journey of effectively engaging a “local” audience around the world.

This article was updated for the life sciences industry. Read the original post here.

“Winning” in Emerging Markets: Localization of Multimedia Content

Pharmaceutical companies continue to expand their presence in emerging markets outside of the U.S. and Western Europe. However, penetrating and succeeding in emerging markets is often difficult. As indicated in this article in PharmExec, many factors account for this difficulty, including government protectionism of local drugmakers (mostly, in generics) and a lack of IP protection, since many emerging economies do not recognize international patent law. But the opportunity is there. A survey by Strategy& of 12 of the top 15 global pharmaceutical companies revealed that 52% expect more than 30% of their global sales to originate in emerging markets by 2018.

To reach new patients and consumers in these markets, global brands are using on screen text (OST) in the localization of their multimedia content to drive advertising campaigns and training programs in multiple languages. Global advertisements of drugs, for example, often include images of the product, taglines and sample text content to highlight certain features. Use of OST can also reduce any ambiguity and display legal or disclaimer content to meet local advertising standards.

The “winners” in emerging markets, according to Strategy&, will be those companies that know how to best balance their global competences with tailored approaches for local markets. To roll out advertising campaigns at a local level, content can be culturally adapted using OST localization techniques to recreate original effects and animations. OST localization can sometimes be more cost-effective and quicker than voice-over work.

Properly adapting and localization a multimedia campaign requires technical skill, creativity, local market knowledge and subject matter expertise. Michael Anderson, Senior Multimedia Engineer at Welocalize Life Sciences’ parent company Welocalize, explains how the OST localization process works:

Obtain video. Simple analysis of the original footage identifies what text requires translation and re-integration into the local language version, including all content, text and animation. Ideally, multimedia localization providers would have access to the original design files and artwork; however, quite often the original content is not available.

Create in baseline. Extract and transcribe the relevant text to generate translation and cultural adaptation. This could involve straight translation or linguistic copy writing. For more technical content, the translation will stay close to the source; however, for marketing content like taglines, this content requires recreating to suit the needs of the target demographic. Any local version of video footage, which will appear on broadcast media or for web advertising purposes, must look as if it has been created in that language.

Integrate new content. If the original design files are not available, then the new content can be “overlaid” and recreated onto the original text to display in local versions. Whether you have access to the original design files or not, most localized content can be seamlessly integrated to generate high quality localized versions of video footage.

Adapt special effects and music. Video footage, whether for global pharmaceutical advertising or employee training programs, often contain certain special effects that must be emulated in each local version. For example, the text fonts must be consistent, along with text shadowing and line breaks and synchronization to music. Quite often, the music track may be changed to suit the local audience and new content must be adapted to the new music. Working with localizing OST also involves a creative process, especially if the original design files and artwork are not available. Specialist teams work with large, high resolution files and must apply localization techniques and creative skills to generate high quality video output in multiple languages.

Content for medical and life sciences, as well as for pharmaceutical companies, is often highly detailed and lengthy, totaling thousands of words to document regulatory compliance in one project. The need for accuracy in translation is obvious, with consequences to health and safety at stake. For more information about Welocalize Life Sciences’ multimedia localization programs and industry expertise, contact us.

Moving Beyond Content

Written by Erin Wynn, Chief Customer Officer at Welocalize, the following article appeared in Multilingual Magazine, July/August 2017 issue. The article, Moving Beyond Content, is a thoughtful view on how client needs in the globalization industry have evolved from transactional translation conducted by multiple vendors to an end-to-end approach, with one provider servicing all localization requirements along the global journey.

DOWNLOAD FULL PDF OF ARTICLE: Moving Beyond Content

I have worked in the globalization and localization industry for nearly 15 years, nine of those with Welocalize and we have seen some big changes over the past couple of decades. We’re in the midst of one of the most revolutionary times in our industry, witnessing a shift from a myopic view of transactional translated content, whether marketing, UI or technical manuals, to language service providers (LSPs) delivering business solutions that serve all the “stops” on the global journey. Solution-selling has been part of the industry for many years, but LSPs now have the resources to address the broader scope. Whether it be through acquisition or maturation of the industry, buyers of language services in any industry no longer have to work with multiple providers to cover the many different global services needs on their globalization journey.

Global language solution providers must service multiple stops on the global journey – from filing a patent application right through to software testing and driving global digital marketing campaigns. Moving away from content and becoming entrenched in a customer’s business and global brand is the evolution. LSPs are becoming an extension of their clients. Many of the stops along the journey don’t have anything to do with translation. We’re not just delivering translation or pure language services anymore. A global digital marketing campaign with targeted SEO activity goes through transcreation. The testing of a localized software product requires engineering skills and an in-depth understanding of a client’s product and brand, not just linguistic skills. The development of APIs to ensure a streamlined workflow across the technology tools may process translations, but the skills required from LSPs no longer reside only in translation. Our industry is moving beyond content and original niche of linguistics and translation. LSPs that will succeed in delivering world-class solutions will service clients across the board, at all the stops, with forward-thinking solution selling and an innovative value approach.

The globalization and localization industry is a consolidating and maturing industry. In May 2010, the Common Sense Advisory (CSA) calculated that the market for outsourced language services was worth US$26.327 billion. Last year, CSA valued the market at US$40.27 – nearly doubling in six years. Some of this consolidation is driven by acquisition, enabling the delivery of solutions across many stops on the journey. In 2016, Welocalize acquired Spanish-based NOVA and Californian-based Global Language Solutions (GLS), in addition to the successful acquisition in 2012 of leading legal solution provider, Park IP Translations. These acquisitions pointedly look to grow solutions into life sciences, healthcare, legal, regulatory and compliance, to help serve clients, from the research and development stage through go-to market and final clinical trials. This year we continued to see further consolidation in the life sciences industry when RWS acquired LUZ, a company with its roots firmly in life sciences and the medical device sector. In May 2017, Amplexor, #9 on CSA 2016 list of largest LSPs, acquired US-based Sajan to increase presence in North America.

To better serve clients, it is an intelligent move for global LSPs to gain entry to specialist areas like life sciences and legal. It completes the full life cycle – the global journey – of bringing products and services to global markets. Our continued growth and expansion mean we are better positioned to mirror the industries we serve.

As we progress and continue to mature and consolidate, the industry will become driven by managed service providers and less language service providers. It’s about creating the ultimate customer experience at a global and local level and that will transcend translation and content.

Erin Wynn is Chief Customer Officer at Welocalize.

Welocalize Ranked in Top 10 Global Language Service Providers

Common Sense Advisory Recognizes Welocalize as the 7th Largest LSP in the World

Frederick, Maryland – July 18, 2017 – Welocalize, global leader in innovative translation and localization solutions, today announced its official ranking as the 7th largest language services provider (LSP) in the world and 4th largest in North America, based on 2016 reported revenues. The rankings were issued by independent market research firm Common Sense Advisory (CSA Research) in the report titled “Who’s Who in Language Services and Technology: 2017 Rankings.” In another recently released CSA report, “The Language Services Market 2017,” the global market for outsourced language services and technology has been valued at US$43.08 billion.

Welocalize recently announced its 20th anniversary, having been founded in 1997 by husband and wife, Smith and Julia Yewell. Welocalize has grown to become a world leader in managed language services and for the past six years, has consistently been ranked in CSA Research’s top 10 global language service providers.

“Welocalize is one of the most well respected brands in the language service industry and our regular appearance in CSA Research’s top ten ranking of global language service providers is testament to our incredible global teams located across our 22+ offices around the world,” said Welocalize CEO Smith Yewell. “Welocalize is celebrating 20 years in the industry this year and over the past two decades, we’ve gone from completing standard translation tasks to strategically managing content transformation across the whole global journey. As an industry leader, we will continue to drive innovation solutions to help global organizations to scale and grow faster.”

As part of the CSA Research study, the firm surveyed providers from every continent to collect actual reported revenue for 2015, 2016, and expected revenue for 2017. CSA Research, which has published market size estimates and global rankings for the past 13 years, found that the demand for language services and supporting technologies continues and is growing at an annual rate of 6.97%, representing an increase over last year’s rate of 5.52%. The language services market is predicted to grow to US$47.46 billion by 2021.

Welocalize Life Sciences provides specialized language solutions for highly regulated industries. Our solutions include industry expert localization and translation services for regulatory and compliance content, document translation, linguistic validation, interpreting, website and marketing localization, eLearning and multimedia services. Welocalize Life Sciences is an industry leader with proven translation and localization proficiency required for global clinical trials, pharmaceuticals, biotech companies, medical devices, healthcare brands, medical providers and government agencies. Welocalize is ISO 9001:2015, ISO 17100 and ISO 13485 certified.

Welocalize, Inc., founded in 1997, offers innovative language services to help global brands reach audiences around the world in more than 175 languages. We provide translation and localization services, talent management, language tools, automation and technology, quality and program management. Our range of managed language services include machine translation, digital marketing, validation and testing, interpretation, staffing and enterprise translation management technologies. We specialize in consumer, technology, manufacturing, learning, oil and gas, travel and hospitality, marketing and advertising, finance, legal and life sciences industry language solutions. With more than 1,500 full-time employees worldwide, Welocalize maintains offices in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Ireland, Spain, Italy, Romania, Poland, Hungary, Japan and China.